Month: January 2011

Daily Leadership Thought #86 – Every Leader Gets Tested

All leaders ultimately reach a point where their resolve is tested and they have to make some form of a moral decision. Words are easy. Action is much more difficult. Just about every organization I work with has a core set of values they have created to communicate what the organization stands for and the boundaries of acceptable behavior.

Daily Leadership Thought #84 – People Can Be A Bridge to Your Future Happiness

It’s easy to get comfortable with who we are and what we know. Building new relationships can seem like hard work in an already busy life. However, people can be a bridge to your future happiness. They can help you see the world in new and different ways. They can offer you a perspective of who you are that is unfiltered by past experience.

Daily Leadership Thought #82 – You Are Paid To Think

Many leaders I know struggle initially with the idea that the most value they bring to their company or organization is their ability to think not act. Of course, thought without action is meaningless. However, the top people in any organization need to regularly step back and reflect on strategic implications, priorities, etc.

Daily Leadership Thought #80 – When It Comes to Goals, Less Is More

The most successful people I know don’t create long lists of goals they want to accomplish. As the saying goes, “if everything is important, than nothing really is.” Instead, they focus on a handful of objectives that will clearly advance the end results they are trying achieve in their work and personal life.

Daily Leadership Thought #79 – People Are Like Snowflakes

The truth in life is that every person you lead, manage, do business with or meet is an individual. We all are unique like snowflakes with each us different in some way, shape or form. Experts often try to categorize people or attempt to make it easy to interpret/predict their actions and motivations, but it is never quite that simple.

What My Dog Taught Me

I have only ever really been a “dog” person when it comes to pets. In my humble opinion, they are the rare pet that actually brings out our better nature and ends up teaching us things about life. There are three things in particular that “Buddy” and his predecessors have taught me: 1) the power of unconditional love; 2) the importance of loyalty and trust in our relationships; and 3) managing the inevitability of grief and loss in life.