Lasting Lessons from My Dad

Sadly, my dad passed away this past weekend. He was 84 and lived a full life. Many times he commented to me that he couldn’t believe he lived this long. When he was a child, he told me, living to 65 seemed like a reasonable expectation. I am glad he beat his own expectations and gave us many more years to be with him. Dad came from a generation where you lived up to your responsibilities. He didn’t complain about it and believed that one of the most important things you could do was to teach your children was to become independent adults. He didn’t coddle us, but also did judge us too harshly. He was always there if needed.

Memorial Day Thoughts – 2020

Another Memorial Day is here although under these strange pandemic circumstances. I hope your loved ones and you are safe and healthy. Thankfully, some things become clearer with aging.  Maybe it’s because we start to realize our own mortality and vulnerability. You begin to appreciate more the sacrifice and courage of others.  When I was […]

Leadership Thought #269 – All Things Must Pass

Whether we like it or not, “all things must pass.” Everything has a beginning and an end. As far as we know, nothing besides space is infinite. Youth, careers, relationships, roles, responsibilities, health, and ultimately life itself, all transition and ultimately conclude at some point.

Leadership Thought #207 – Bad Things Do Happen

Bad things do happen in life. Sometimes they test our emotional and physical fortitude but we have to persevere anyway. There really is no other acceptable choice but to be resilient in the face of pain and adversity even when it really hurts.

What My Dog Taught Me

I have only ever really been a “dog” person when it comes to pets. In my humble opinion, they are the rare pet that actually brings out our better nature and ends up teaching us things about life. There are three things in particular that “Buddy” and his predecessors have taught me: 1) the power of unconditional love; 2) the importance of loyalty and trust in our relationships; and 3) managing the inevitability of grief and loss in life.